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jimcrook@live.com
jimcrook@live.com's picture
Filing
SoftPlan Version:
2014 Plus

Just curious how everyone else manages their job folders ?

 

I have typically just used an alphabetical folder listing and a client name i.e. I have an A - folder underwhich I file all folks whose last name begins with A, and

a B - folder for last names beginning with B etc. etc.      This works great for looking up projects by name.     What I haven't done and occaisionally wished I

had is seperate out or at leas list the projects by type i.e. New Home - Bungalows, New Homes - 2 Storey, Garages, Decks etc.   

 

So in other words if a client asks me to show them a few samples of 2 storey homes I've drawn, I don; thave a specific list for this and I have to try to remember what projects might fit.   Now I know this seems elementary and I could simply take some time and make a listing of the various types that I could refer to, but it got me to wondering what others were doing and whether there were some inovative ideas out there ?

 

Anyone ?

 

Jim

Larry
Larry's picture
I do the opposite

When I start a new plan, I classify it by style - cabin - 2 story - split foyer.  Then I list it by lot number or by customer name.

Bill Wimberley
Bill Wimberley's picture
File structure
  1. Custom Plans
    1. Customer Name
  2. Builder Plans
    1. Builder Name
      1. Major Plan Name
        1. Plan Variation
          1. Customer Name or if no customer then Subdivision/Block/Lot

Bill is the owner and maintainer of SoftPlanTuts.com

david ayers
david ayers's picture
I name job folders with

I name job folders with clients' names. If it's builder's project, I'll include something in the name that will distinguish which of that builder's project it is. I don't name plans themselves, however. I assign each plan a number (it's on each sheet of the plans, but not on the folder that contains them) that is width-depth(of the footprint)-heated square footage. 720-568-5783. I like the fact that with this practice the "name" of the plan conveys useful, hard, frequently critical information about it.

David Ayers