Attic Room Trusses

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JerryQberry
JerryQberry's picture
Attic Room Trusses
SoftPlan Version:
2016 Plus

In our neck of the woods we do a tremendous amount of attic room roof trusses over the garage with varying heel heights depending on room size. I haven't gotten into the program to the point where I have done a roof yet but I am currently designing a second floor with this situation. Do you folks show the interior short walls of the attic room area as walls or do you use something related to the roof tools to create them. I apologize for not having done better research before asking this question but I'm struggling with the program and I'm being pushed for floor plans at the same time. I'd be grateful for any assistance.

 

Thank you,

Bill Wimberley
Bill Wimberley's picture
Attic Rooms

I treat built-out space in an attic just as a 2nd floor. I use the method described in the tutorial Calculating Buildable Area in an Attic Space to lay out the buildable area and then go from there.

Bill is the owner and maintainer of SoftPlanTuts.com

JerryQberry
JerryQberry's picture
Roof Questions

Two Three questions on your tutorial Bill.

 

1) Is it ok to put the plates that you created on a different building option so that you can cut them off off so that they will not interfere with the first floor model? Or if you cut them off will the roof that is tied to them disappear also?

2) Will there be issues of any sort tying the roofs together if the attic room trusses sit on the first floor garage walls and the rest of the roof sits on the second floor walls?

3) How do you handle it when your heel height creates a situation where wall sheathing must be added to the face of the roof truss to cover the ends?

 

Thank you,

Bill Wimberley
Bill Wimberley's picture
Roof

Is it ok to put the plates that you created on a different building option so that you can cut them off off so that they will not interfere with the first floor model? Or if you cut them off will the roof that is tied to them disappear also?

Turning off a Building Option only affects objects that are assigned to that Building Option. So if you have plates assigned to a certain BO turning that BO off will not turn the roof off as well unless the roof is also assigned that same BO. However, roofs must be attached to something. Either a wall or a beam. So if you turn off the walls that the roof is attached to you will run into lots of problems because the roof will no longer be attached to anything. If you do not want to use plates to attach the roof to you could instead use "Multiple Floor Roof". Multiple Floor Roof is very similar to Overlay in that it allows you to see the floors below and attach the roof to not only the current floor but also walls and beams from the floor below.


Multiple Floor Roof
 

2) Will there be issues of any sort tying the roofs together if the attic room trusses sit on the first floor garage walls and the rest of the roof sits on the second floor walls?

Your roofs should always be on the same drawing. You don't want part of your roof on the first floor drawing and part of the roof on the second floor drawing. So on a two story house the entire roof should be created on the second floor plan.

3) How do you handle it when your heel height creates a situation where wall sheathing must be added to the face of the roof truss to cover the ends?

In your example shown edit the side walls below and select "Fit to Soffit". This will adjust the siding up to the soffit while leaving the walls themselves unchanged. Depending on how you have your gable created you may need to put in a subfloor in order to get the siding to go down to the brick.

JerryQberry
JerryQberry's picture
Heel Height

I may be a bit anal here but is the heel height as listed in SoftPlan's Roof Options parameters drawn from the bottom of roof truss bearing to top of roof truss/rafter or to top of sheathing?

Bill Wimberley
Bill Wimberley's picture
Heel Height

Heel Height is measured from top of wall or beam to top of rafter, measured vertically from the outer edge of the bearing portion of the wall or beam. The bearing portion is typically the framing, but the wall could be defined to have other materials be bearing as well.

JerryQberry
JerryQberry's picture
Thank you Bill. Just wanted

Thank you Bill. Just wanted to make sure.